Tuesday, December 12, 2017

How Abs Scams Sucker People In

When you look on the internet for any considerable amount of time, you will see just how keen people are to sell something to you. It is practically impossible to spend any real time online without seeing ads, spam emails and other marketing tactics that are designed to hook you in, and they are often quite successful in attracting customers.

Why are tactics which border on the scamming, and ones which even step over that border, so often successful? The major reason is not, whatever people may tell you, that people are ultimately gullible. In fact, it is a testament to the clever tactics the marketers use. It is hard to sell someone an item or a service they don’t already want or need.

It is a lot easier to sell someone something they think they need, or that they want. If someone in a world without lies told you tomorrow that you could own a machine that printed legally passable money, and get it for a low price, you would jump at the chance to have it, would you not? In the world of the internet, people realise that good abs are something desirable, so they are easy to sell.

Does this mean that everyone who tries to sell an abs-hardening program online is trying to scam you? No – not at all – but what it does mean is that you have to be careful that you are not buying something because you are too desperate to not buy it.


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